Rabble Lit Issue 2/ A New Poetry

“The same people who are murdered slowly in the mechanized slaughterhouses of work are also arguing, singing, drinking, dancing, making love, holding the streets, picking up weapons and inventing a new poetry.” 

-Raoul Vaneigem


Charlottesville/ Alice Beecher

the woken memories of our grandfathers/ the hot south spinning into sap/ the taut cobweb of bracing knuckles/ a symbol like a broken limb/ the fear that repeats itself like water/ the fear that repeats itself like water

Project Semicolon/ Patrick J. Derilus

death need not know/ that i am aware that it/ follows my Black body–


New Cybernetics/ J.L. Bogenschneider

T-ness & R-ability are qualities ascribed to people but there’s no reason they can’t be applied to machines, T in particular «a kind of knowing» and it’s actually harder to trust people because they’re unpredictable…


Interview: Leesa Cross-Smith

A true Kentuckian, homemaker, Jesus-lover, and music enthusiast with impeccable taste, Leesa is somehow both a true “writer’s writer” and someone who knows how to be completely down-to-earth.


Two Poems/ Luisa Black

Because they know the piety of/ What collects sound without addition or distortion/ And refracts light without absorption…


Resumé/ Sarah Pape

You told me years later that to smoke meth at work, you would lock yourself in the supply closet, stand on top of your cart with a plastic bag, breathe the toxic smoke into it and hold it directly to the air vent. It was one of many rituals you had perfected in hiding your world from me.


You Can’t Put That In There/ Erin Langley

When I was 37, my partner came into the room with a handful of sticks. He had pulled them out of the garbage disposal. “You can’t put that in there,” he said.